Academic Course Catalog

The Academic Course Catalog is a list of approved courses currently available through Canada Christian College. This is not a list of scheduled classes; rather, it is a list of potential courses that may be scheduled in a term.

Please note, these descriptions reflect both the online and residential versions; however, when registering for online, the difference is indicated by the letter “O” at the beginning of each course code. For example: BIBL 235 is the residential version, and OBIBL 235 is the online version.

Courses are listed under the following academic departments:

Ministry

Business & Communications

Christian Counselling

Religious Education

School of Music 

Ministry

This course introduces students to the Pentateuch (the first five books of the Bible) as well as the historical Old Testament books (from Joshua to Esther). For each book, care will be taken to introduce its main characters, significant events, and key themes. In addition to this high-level understanding, students will explore prominent vocabulary, important verses, and notable chapters in these portions of the Old Testament.

Prerequisite: None

This course introduces students to the five books known as Wisdom Literature (Job, Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, and Song of Solomon).  Care will be taken to examine key themes and issues raised in each book.  Additionally, this course provides a broad overview of the major and minor prophets (Isaiah-Malachi).  For each book, students will be exposed to main characters, significant events, and key themes. In addition to this high-level understanding, students will explore prominent vocabulary, important verses, and notable chapters in these portions of the Old Testament.

Prerequisite: None

This course introduces students to the stories and people of the Gospels and the Book of Acts. Concerning the four Gospels, students will be introduced to the different narrative elements of each gospel as well as their unique foci. The course will also examine the early church and the work of the Holy Spirit in God’s people.

Prerequisite: None

This course introduces students to the stories and key figures in the books of Romans through Revelation.  In each of these books, students will be introduced to specific narrative elements, unique foci, and key themes. The course will also investigate the authorship of each book and their intended audience. Prerequisite: None

An introductory course in Bible study methodologies designed to help students develop basic skills for effective Bible study. Students will become familiar with Bible study strategies that will aid their ability to conduct effective analysis of difficult passages.

Prerequisite: None

This course surveys the Pauline epistles beginning with the Corinthian correspondence. Careful consideration is given to the text of each epistle, its doctrinal teaching and practical implications in the Christian life.

A continuation of Pauline Epistles I surveying the Pauline epistles and the Book of Hebrews. Consideration is given to the text of each epistle, its doctrinal teaching and practical implications in the Christian life.

Prerequisite: BIBL 305

A careful consideration to the historical context and textual contents of the final eight books of the New Testament and the unique contributions of Peter, James, Jude and John to our understanding of the Christian doctrine.

Prerequisite: None

An analytical and expository study of the Gospel of John emphasizing the miracles and “I am” discourses of Christ as well as John’s portrayal of the deity of Christ.

Prerequisite: None

A study of the two Corinthian epistles identifying the kinds of problems faced by the first century church and Paul’s instructions concerning each. A special consideration is given to the unique character of Corinth and the Corinthian church as a ministry model for cosmopolitan churches today.

Prerequisite: None

This course introduces students to the background and general analysis of Ephesians, Philippians, Colossians and Philemon. Attention is given to such introductory matters as date, authorship, occasion and purpose of each epistle.

Prerequisite: None

A study of the psalms including various themes represented in this Old Testament book. Among topics considered are the view of God reflected in the psalms, messianic teachings in the psalms.

Prerequisite: None

An analytical and expository study of the epistles of Paul to the Thessalonians with consideration given to insights concerning Paul’s ministry style at the beginning of his second missionary journey. Attention is also given to such introductory matters as date, authorship, occasion and purpose.

Prerequisite: None

This course examines the mystery of the symbolism of the dramatic descriptions given in this book. A careful analysis of each chapter is given with fresh insight made available only as we experience modern progress. The compelling events of recent years make the study of this book a must for every student.

Prerequisite: None

An analytical study of the book of Acts and the spread of Christianity from Jerusalem throughout Asia Minor in the first century world will be done. Consideration is given to the historic context of the Pauline writings and the nature of apostolic Christianity. An examination of the work of the Holy Spirit and His impact on the early church will be a part of this course. The development and results of the ministries of the apostles through the first century and how that sets an example for us today will prove beneficial to the student.

Prerequisite: None

This course is a study of the background and general analysis of Paul’s great treatise on the Christian faith. Topics considered in this course are the doctrines of sin, justification by faith alone, the process of sanctification, the role of Israel in the plan of God and the practical nature of Christian doctrine.

Prerequisite: None

A study of the historical background, authorship and analysis of Genesis with special emphasis being given to the expository treatment of the text. A primary focus will be on the historicity of creation, the flood and other recorded events in this book and their doctrinal implications in the Christian life.

Prerequisite: None

An analytical and expository study of the three epistles of John and their contributions to our understanding of biblical Christianity. Attention is given to authorship, date, occasion and purpose.

Prerequisite: None

A study of the historical background, authorship and analysis of the history and prophecy of Jeremiah with a special emphasis being given to the expository treatment of the text.

Prerequisite: None

A study of the historical background, authorship and analysis of the history and prophecy of Daniel with a special emphasis being given to the expository treatment of the text.

Prerequisite: None

An analytical and expository study of Paul’s epistles to Timothy and Titus with consideration given to his instructions concerning various aspects of church administration. The study also examines authorship, date, occasion and purpose of the books.

Prerequisite: None

This study examines the book of Hebrews in light of the Old Testament context of sacrifice and priesthood. Attention is also given to authorship, date, occasion and purpose.

Prerequisite: None

This course teaches basic principles of Biblical interpretation and various approaches to interpreting the Bible. Difficult passages will be examined in light of the original language and culture.

Prerequisite: Old and New Testament Survey Courses

A comprehensive study of the Old Testament tabernacle and its typical significance will be examined. This study will examine truths about the nature and work of Christ as portrayed in the service of the tabernacle.

Prerequisite: Studies in Old Testament Survey

A study of the life and book of Job with an emphasis on the problem of suffering and other issues arising out of Job’s experience. The questions of bad things happening to good people and God’s divine plan in the affairs of our lives will be examined. God’s value system verses our value system will be addressed.

Prerequisite: None

The course takes a critical look at the book of Galatians, its authorship, message, and theology. The impact of this book on the Christian life will also be considered. Paul’s thoughts concerning the Law, the gospel and his motive in missions will be a primary focus.

Prerequisite: None

An analytical and expository study of Ephesians as Paul’s treatise on the Christian life will be covered in this course. It will look at the message of the book to us as part of the family of believers under the influence of the Holy Spirit.

Prerequisite: None

In these books Paul is seen as the compassionate encourager. These books reveal a side of Paul and the message of God’s grace that give these books special attraction.

Prerequisite: None

This course is an introductory study of the significant contributions made by archaeology to New Testament studies, especially in the context of providing additional insights into the meaning of the Biblical text and confirming the historical accuracy of the text. Attention is given to the history, customs and geography of the Biblical world from the inter-testamental period through the first century A.D.

Prerequisite: New Testament Survey courses

This course introduces students to the significant contributions made by archaeology to Old Testament studies, especially in the context of providing additional insights into the meaning of the text and confirming the historical accuracy of the text. Attention is given to the history and customs of the era and of the nations influencing life in ancient Israel.

Prerequisite: Studies in Old Testament Surveys

This advanced course deals with the history and background of the New Testament scriptures. The canon, text and interpretation of the New Testament including an introduction to various critical approaches to biblical studies will be covered. The manuscripts and the debate surrounding them will be addressed. The teaching of the New Testament in the divine plan of God will be discussed. Prerequisite: Studies in Old and New Testament Surveys

This advanced course examines the history, background, text and canon of the Old Testament scriptures. The course also introduces students to interpretive approaches to the Old Testament including various critical approaches to Old Testament studies.

Prerequisite: Studies in Old and New Testament Surveys

This course provides an analytical and expository study of this book with a view to unlocking the secrets of Christian joy in the midst of adverse circumstances and situations. We will look at the importance of a positive mental attitude. This book has been referred to as the book of the mind.

Prerequisite: None

This study covers the lifestyle and culture of the Israelite people in the times of the Bible. The geography, while unchanged, provides major insights into the land, culture, and ways of the people. A study of the geography will open a new world of understanding the Bible. This course involves a trip to Israel. Each student will be responsible for the additional cost associated with the tour itself.

Prerequisite: Studies in Old and New Testament Surveys are strongly recommended.

An introduction to the study of the Holy Spirit including types, metaphors and descriptions of the Holy Spirit in scriptures with the goal of achieving a greater understanding of the third person of the Trinity.

Prerequisite: None

A survey and overview of fundamental theological topics such as the doctrine of divine revelation, the Bible, God, creation, providence, angels, and humankind.

Prerequisite: None

This second part of the course in systematic theology surveys fundamental Christian doctrines such as doctrine of sin, salvation, and the Holy Spirit.

Prerequisite: THEO 240

This third part of systematic theology continues to examine the basic Christian doctrine. Topics covered in this third part includes doctrine of the church and doctrine of last things (eschatology).

Prerequisite: THEO 240 and THEO 280

An examination of various social and moral issues including abortion, capital punishment, homosexuality, marriage, divorce, remarriage, and war. Topics addressed may also include ethics surrounding scientific research that has to do with stem cells and cloning. Students will examine Biblical principles upon which an ethical Christian response to these issues is based.

Prerequisite: None

A comprehensive study of dispensationalism including its history, hermeneutics, teachings in relation to soteriology, ecclesiology, eschatology and comparison with ultra dispensationalism and covenant theology.

Prerequisite: None

An examination of the various doctrines of the Bible. This course helps students develop a deep appreciation for the Christian doctrines as well as establish a basis for the things they believe in.

Prerequisite: None

This course will deal in depth with the plan of God for Christ to come into the world as recorded in both the Old and New Testaments. The miraculous birth, life teaching, death and resurrection of Christ will be examined. The many prophecies that were fulfilled through Jesus Christ will be carefully examined.

Prerequisite: None

An examination of the harmonious relationship between the scriptures and essential facts of science. Issues considered in this course include creation, intelligent design, evolution, the flood, miracles and biblical statements of scientific significance.

Prerequisite: None

This course introduces students to the history, assumptions, and development of the theory of evolution. Students examine the theory of evolution against the truth of scripture as well as present models of modern science to uncover inconsistencies and weaknesses in the theory. Issues considered in this course include intelligence design, creation, geological ages, geological catastrophism and Biblical catastrophism, anthropology and biological changes in species.

A study of one of Christianity’s oldest creedal statements with a focus on its contents as a summary of orthodox evangelical theology.

A survey of the history, worldview, and forms of Hinduism as well as its contemporary manifestations are examined. Students are introduced to the Christian response to the forms and worldview of this ancient religion and its modern forms. Consideration is also given to the evangelism of Hindus both on the mission field and here in the Western society.

Prerequisite: None

A survey and comparative study of the origins, philosophical background, basic beliefs and religious practices of Buddhism, Taoism, and other forms of non- Hindu eastern religions.

Prerequisite: None

This course aims to introduce students to the spectrum of world religions from a Christian perspective.  In the first half of this course students will be informed of the basic tenets and practices of Judaism, Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism, Confucianism, Taoism, Sikhism, and New Religious Movements.  In the second half of the course, students will be equipped with the best approaches of presenting the Gospel to adherents of various faiths.  The ultimate goal of this course is to equip students to be missionaries (both within their local communities and internationally), apologists within their families and congregations, and scholars of religious thought generally.  As the world is becoming increasingly interconnected, individuals cannot afford to remain ignorant of other faiths.  Thus, for the sake of the gospel, faithful Christians must equip themselves to address the pluralistic realities surrounding them.

A survey of Animism and ancestral worship in its various contemporary manifestations New Age philosophy and the Christian response to this worldview. Special consideration is given to evangelism of Animists and those involved in animistic cults both on the mission field and here in the West.

Prerequisite: None

A survey of the origin and development of the religion of Islam as well as its various contemporary manifestations. Throughout the course students learn to develop appropriate responses to the worldview and claims of Islam. Special attention is given to the evangelism of Muslims both on the mission field and here in the Western society.

Prerequisite: None

A study of the various religious cults with an emphasis on understanding the teachings of major groups such as Jehovah’s Witnesses and Mormons as typical of other smaller sectarian movements.

Prerequisite: None

This course is an introduction to Christian apologetics and is meant to furnish the student with the basic skills to articulate the truth in defence of the Christian faith with clarity, scholarship and authority. Students are introduced to the essential issues in apologetics as well as the four major apologetics systems.

Prerequisite: None

A study of the promises of God to Abraham, the nature of the covenant, its implications in the experience of Israel, and its application to the Christian life.

Prerequisite: None

This course matches students with ministerial practitioners to enhance their knowledge of homiletics, pastoral care, and other aspects of professional ministry.

This course introduces students to the exegetical study of the Book of Romans. A word for word study of this epistle to the Romans in the original Greek language. Students receive a deeper understanding of the rich text of this powerful letter where we find the central doctrines of salvation.

Prerequisite: GREK 400, GREK 501

A study of the nature and principles of prayer with careful examination given to its critical place in the life of the church and the life of the believer. Students will develop a conceptualization of and an appreciation for prayer as a spiritual discipline necessary for a relationship with God and a productive and healthy Christian life.

Prerequisite: None.

The thesis of this course is that the people and the land of modern Israel are still God’s chosen. Contrary to many Christian opinions, plus world opinion, God is not finished with His people. This thesis is tested against scriptures, both Old and New Testament covenants, with concentration on the New Covenant theology of Israel in light of two thousand years of Church History, modern history and current events.

Prerequisite: HIST 590 (History of Israel) is recommended

A systematic theology of the Biblical teaching’s regarding the people of Israel, surveying every aspect of Israel’s past, present and future. The course provides a systematized biblical doctrine of Israel. Israelology pioneers a fully dispensational approach to this topic including issues such as Messiah’s return, evangelism, anti-Semitism and God’s agenda for Jews and Gentile alike.

Prerequisite: HIST 590 (History of Israel) is recommended

This course explores the Old Testament shadows of things to come in the future; that is, the fulfillment of the promises in Jesus Christ. Many of the types of Christ will be examined. The prophecies concerning the Messiah will be noted and the appearances of the Lord in the Old Testament pointed out. The plan of God through the Old Testament servants of God will be discussed.

Prerequisite: Old Testament Surveys as well as BIBL 620

This course will summarize the teachings of the New Testament and presents these teachings in its own terms rather than within the framework of Systematic Theology. Biblical theology will be a major part of the approach in that attention will be given to the distinctive contributions of the major New Testament writers and their writings.

Prerequisite: Studies in Old and New Testament Surveys as well as BIBL 615

An introduction to current issues in theology being debated in theological journals and symposiums. Specific issues studied are chosen by the assign professor to reflect the ongoing and current issues being debated at the time the course is offered.

Prerequisite: Studies in Systematic Theology (THEO 240, THEO 280, & THEO 300)

A study of the basic presuppositions and approaches to theology and consideration of the existence of God who reveals Himself to His people in various ways. Special attention is given to His self-revelation in the scriptures and the nature and character of the scriptures themselves.

Prerequisite: Studies in Systematic Theology.

A study of the Biblical teachings concerning the nature and character of God including the concept of the Trinity and the person and work of the Holy Spirit. The works of God in the creation of both material and spiritual beings are also a focus of this course.

Prerequisite: Studies in Systematic Theology

A study of the biblical teachings concerning both the deity and humanity of Christ including such issues as His virgin birth, incarnation, atoning death, resurrection and ascension to heaven. Consideration is also given to the pre-existence of Christ and His ministry on behalf of believers.

Prerequisite: Studies in Systematic Theology

This course introduces students to an in-depth study of the biblical teachings concerning the work of God in saving people for His glory. Various metaphors describing His saving work is considered in the context of their implications in the Christian life.

Prerequisite: Studies in Systematic Theology

A study of the Biblical teachings concerning the nature of the church and the role of individual believers within the corporate community of faith. Attention is given to various views of the church and church polity in light of biblical teaching on the subject.

Prerequisite: Studies in Systematic Theology

A study of the Biblical teachings concerning both personal and prophetic eschatology. Among the topics considered in this course are the nature of death and the afterlife, approaches to the interpretation of prophecy and the biblical teaching concerning the return of Christ to establish His kingdom and related events.

Prerequisite: Studies in Systematic Theology

This course code is used to designate Master-level students in the process of writing their thesis.

This course introduces students to advanced leadership studies in church and non-profit settings.

This course code is used to designate doctoral-level students in the process of writing their dissertation.

Students desirous of entering professional ministry may elect to undergo internships at approved churches for course credit.

The purpose of this course is to lead students into an understanding of the process and stages through which a new believer develops into a mature and spiritually productive Christian. Students are introduced to the process and dynamics of personal spiritual development and maturity.

Prerequisite: None

This course is designed to teach students the art of public speaking. Students will be introduced to the art of persuading people as well as how to analyze one’s audience. Special emphasis will be given to aspects of effective presentation such as outlining, supporting points, gesture, delivery methods and voice control to achieve maximum effectiveness.

Prerequisite: None

A study of the science and art of preparing Biblical sermons. Students are introduced to various styles and forms of sermon preparation. Among these styles and forms are exegetical, topical, textual, and expository sermons.

Prerequisite: BIBL 300

A study of the principles and practice of sermon delivery. Students explore and examine various methods of sermon presentations and discuss the strengths and limitations of each in light of personal styles and effectiveness.

Prerequisite: MINS 202 and MINS 210 are recommended

Beginning with God’s covenant with Abraham in the book of Genesis, this course explores the defining characteristics of Biblical and Rabbinic Judaism with an emphasis on Judaism’s relationship to the founding of Christianity. Moving through history, the course examines Judaism as it develops through the centuries of exile, anti-Semitism (including Christian persecution of the Jews), the birth of the modern State of Israel, and Jewish-Christian relations today. The course is mainly built around weekly reading assignments and group discussion of those readings. In addition, videos and guest lectures – both live and pre-recorded –supplement the readings and class discussions. Students are expected to engage in in-depth analysis of selected topics for their midterm and final papers.

A course on the value, dignity and worth of all individuals and how to Biblically support people from all walks of life including those in the LGBTQ community. God has made all in His image and loves all people regarding their ethnicity, background and sexual orientation. The Gospel presented without love and dignity is not complete.

A study of the process of preparing and delivering biblical sermons beginning with the interpretation of the Biblical text and proceeding to the effective communication of the message.

Prerequisite: BIBL 300; (MINS 202 is recommended but not required)

A study of the work of evangelism as a function of every Christian. The student will study various strategies of personal evangelism and learn how to respond to the most common objections encountered in evangelistic ministry.

Prerequisite: THEO 405 is recommended but not required.

An examination of the motives and strategies for establishing a new church with attention given to the practical steps involved including registration with Revenue Canada as a charitable organization.

Prerequisite: None

This course builds upon previous sermon preparation and delivery courses to introduce students to preaching within hostile or non-Christian settings.

A study of the theology and practice of church administration in the context of church government are examined. Students are further introduced to principles and procedure for starting a church, church officers and their duties and the nature of business administration in the church.

Prerequisite: None

This course investigates the issues inherent in the concept of “lay or Peer counselling”, especially as a model that is implemented within the ministries of a local church. Consideration is given to the recruiting and training of such counsellors, with special attention given to the fluid dynamics of a normal church life and limitations.

Prerequisite: None

The history of the Christianity spans over 2,000 years and includes the lives and writings of countless theologians, evangelists, and pastors.  From Augustine to Thomas Aquinas, Martin Luther to John Nelson Darby, and A.B. Simpson to Watchman Nee, this course offers an overview of several of the most prominent Christian thinkers who have shaped the faith we have inherited.  Students from any denominational background will benefit from this course as they gain insight into the persons and doctrines that have helped to expound and unveil the divine revelation of the Scriptures.

A study and evaluation of the importance and operation of the ministry of music and worship in the church. A practical approach is presented concerning the many problems arising in connection to church music, with an emphasis on the problems and needs of the smaller congregations.

Prerequisite: None

This course introduces students to the study of small group ministries within the church. The thesis of the course is that the theology and practice of biblical discipleship requires an element of interrelatedness. The broad structure of the course will include a presentation of the theological and procedural basis for “corporate discipleship” within the local church.

Prerequisite: None

This course aims to introduce students to the history of Israel within biblical, theological, and historical contexts.  In the first eight weeks of the course students will study ancient Israel, spanning from the pre-Patriarchal period until the destruction of the second Temple in 70 AD.  In the last four weeks of the course students will examine the modern state of Israel, inclusive of the Balfour Declaration, the BDS movement, the hoped-for third Temple, and possession of disputed territories (West Bank, Gaza Strip, and Golam Heights).  Several questions will guide the course and situate Israel within a Christian worldview, such as: (1) is there a relationship between the biblical Israel and modern nation-state?  (2) should Christians support the modern state of Israel?  (3) what role does Jewish eschatology play in Christian hopes for the next age?  The ultimate goal of this course is to equip students to be well-acquainted with the history of Israel and recognize the undeniable relationship between the physical and spiritual sons of Abraham.

This course introduces students to evaluating communities using metrics and key performance indicators for the advancement of the gospel.

This course equips students with the toolset necessary to use youth-related organizations for ministerial purposes.

A study of the principles of success in ministry as identified by the nineteenth century prince of preachers, Charles Haddon Spurgeon. These principles which guided him in in building one of the world’s most significant ministries are considered and adapted to our contemporary culture.

This course introduces students to the utilization of sports camps and other athletic events for youth and community gospel outreach.  Students will have access to the school’s athletic facilities for practical workshops. 

This course examines practical issues of evangelism and church growth in the context of the local church ministry. Planning, leadership, preparing and mobilizing people in ministry are examined in light of church growth research as steps toward the goal of planning a local church growth strategy.

Prerequisite: None

An examination of the strategies of preaching the gospel to various cultures including a focus of how to identify and overcome cultural barriers to the presentation of the gospel. Students are also introduced to principles as to how to adapt the message of the gospel to the understanding of other cultures without compromising its truths.

An introduction to the work of Christian missions worldwide including a discussion of issues such as the indigenous church, the use of mission compounds, the role of missionaries, strategies for funding missionary activities, short-term mission projects verses career missions and effective missionary strategies being used today in various parts of the world.

Prerequisite: None

In this course students are introduced to the theological discipline of ethics. The course is designed to encourage moral formation and development in Christian leadership. Throughout the course students explore what is meant by the Christian moral ideal as well as biblical principles for moral actions and judgement in a contemporary context.

Prerequisite: None

Within each of us lies the potential to be an effective leader. Natural leadership qualities are lying dormant within human beings. With this, the primary emphasis of this course is to introduce students to the profound theme of “domination” as seen in Genesis 1: 26-28.

Prerequisite: None

The philosophy of Christian leadership is based on selfless service to others. The love of Jesus is at the center of this course. The course introduces the student to contemporary issues and theory of leadership. It examines, explores and contrasts biblical and secular models and definitions of leadership.

Prerequisite: None

“It takes time to become a leader. While a few people appear to be born leaders, the ability to lead is actually a collection of skills, nearly all of which can be learned and sharpened” Dr. John C. Maxwell provides students with a great resource to help them maximize their leadership skills and potential.

Prerequisite: None

This course introduces students to the legal and financial frameworks that are necessary to administrating a church or non-profit organization in a secular world.

Nehemiah is portrayed as a role model for Christian leadership. Through a critical study of the book, students are introduced to the importance of vision, and calling, the need to share a vision and getting others involved in materializing the goals, and the need to maintain quality leadership in times of crisis.

Prerequisite: None

This course provides a broad introduction to students related to connecting churches and non-profit organizations to the broader community.

Students are introduced to the biblical model as well as to the theory of servant leadership. The course explores the biblical teaching of Christ on the nature and practice of this effective and profound model of leadership. Throughout the course students will compare and contrast other forms of leadership with the servant leadership model presented in scripture.

This course introduces students to the practical spheres of leadership pertaining to financial well-being, psychological well-being, and familial well-being.

How do leaders relate to those who they are leading?  This course aims to address this key issue.

This course examines biblical models of leadership such as Abraham, Moses, Daniel, Jesus, and Paul.  The goal of this course is to discern what positive attributes biblical leaders had and connect them to present day realities students will face in their ministerial careers.

This course introduces students to the principles of moral theology and their application to contemporary issues faced by the church. Students will explore and learn to think theologically and morally about such issues as economic and social justice, war and peace, human sexuality, reproductive technologies and medical issues.

Prerequisite: None

A study of church history during the Apostolic Age, the Ante-Nicene period, and the Post-Nicene period, with consideration given to doctrinal development during this period.

Prerequisite: None

A study of church history from Medieval period and the Protestant Reformation, including the study of Luther, Calvin, Zwingli, and others to the present.

Prerequisite: None

A study of the expansion of missions, from the ministry of William Carey to the present with a concentration on evangelical missions.

Prerequisite: None

This introductory course gives students a Fundamental understanding of the main philosophies and philosophers that have dominated thoughts and ideas throughout time, and how they compare to the truths of scripture. Special focus in this course will be on such themes as the nature of philosophy, free will and determinism, human nature, freedom and responsibility, atheism and the belief in God, the nature of good and evil, the nature of reality, logic, the nature of knowledge, ethics, etc.

The first part of this course introduces students to alternative worldviews such as deism, existentialism, naturalism, atheism, etc. The second part focuses on the nature and implications of the Christian worldview in contrast to alternatives. Students will learn what it means to think about the nature of reality, knowledge, freedom vs determinism, human nature, good vs evil, human responsibility, science, the existence of God, intelligent design, and logic from a Christian perspective.

Prerequisite: None

This course is designed to introduce graduate learners to the nature and practice of critical thinking. Students will learn to apply critical reasoning to a variety of situations; such as asking questions, making sound decisions, assessing truth claims and assertions, as well as avoiding fallacious reasoning.

Prerequisite: None

A study of the basic rules of English grammar and writing skills required to complete college-level course assignment.

Prerequisite: Grade 12 English or equivalent *(Note: students may be required to take ENGL 205)

A continuation of English Grammar and Composition I with an emphasis on basic rules of grammar and writing skills required to complete college-level course assignment.

Prerequisite: ENGL 210

A study of New Testament Greek with an emphasis on basic vocabulary and grammar needed to read the Greek New Testament.

Prerequisite: None

A continuation of Greek I with an emphasis on reading the Greek New Testament. Prerequisite: GREK 400

This course introduces students to a study of the exegetical method of using the Greek text. Consideration is given to Greek syntax, translating from Greek into English, and important terms and concepts. Prerequisite: GREK 400, GREK 501 (Greek I and Greek II)

This course is a continuation of Greek 3. Students continue to develop competence and proficiency in understanding, translating and using the Greek text.

Prerequisite: GREK 505

This first course in Hebrew introduces students to the fundamentals of the Hebrew language, its grammar and syntax. In this course students will develop basic skills in translation and will assimilate a vocabulary of the most common biblical Hebrew words.

Prerequisite: None

This course is a continuation of Hebrew I with an increased emphasis on efficiency in the use of lexical and exegetical tools.

Prerequisite: HEBW 401 (Hebrew I)

This first course in research introduces students to the fundamentals of research. Students are introduced to the various aspects of the research process as well as how to read and analyze selected research articles. Topics include steps in the research process, selecting and formulating the research topic, formulating the research question, formatting and writing the prospectus. Students will also learn proper APA, MLA, or Turabian writing and citation styles. The capstone of this course is the preparing and writing of a basic research outline and the writing of a research project in the student’s particular field of study.

Prerequisite: None

Students will develop an understanding of the theoretical bases of scientific research and an introductory understanding of the research process. Problems associated with conducting research will be examined and students will gain the ability to evaluate professional literature in order to develop critical thinking skills to assess about the quality of research findings in light of sound theological understanding. The capstone of this course is the design and development of an academic research proposal.

Prerequisite: RESH 400

This course refines the basic research and writing skills necessary for doctoral and professional writing. Students in this course develop proficiency and confidence in research and writing by engaging in writing assignments which challenge them to improve skills in specific area of competence.

Prerequisite: RESH 400 (Mechanics of Research)

Students may work under an approved professional for one semester to earn degree credit.

Business & Communications

This course introduced students to the environment and functions of business. Organization and operation of business, the relationships of business to society, and the dominant field and types of business are surveyed.

Prerequisite: None

This course is designed to give students a strong background in forms of business ownership. The course will examine entrepreneurship and franchising.

Prerequisite: None

The course introduces students to the basics of the computers and its applications as well as its hardware, software, peripherals, operating systems, word processing, database management, communications, networking, CD drives, graphics, and voice receptions.

Prerequisite: None

A study of the nature, principles and functions of marketing as well as the institutions involved in the production and distribution of goods and services from producer to consumer.

Prerequisite: None

This course introduces students to consumer behaviour theory and advertising methodology. 

This course will give students a working knowledge of computer applications that will assist in the development of efficient business operation.

Prerequisite: None

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of effective business writing with consideration given to clarity and professionalism in communicating business objective in writing.

Prerequisite: None

The course introduces students to a survey of business administration. Students will learn about management and leadership, leading to the understanding of how to organize a business and manage operation and production. Contemporary management practice and tools in the information age will also be a focus of this study.

Prerequisite: None

The course looks first at the growing importance of small business in Canada. Students learn how to prepare a business plan that would be generally be accepted by financial institutions. The course looks at how to identify principal customers and competitors and how to go about looking for capital to fund the business. The preparation of cash flow statements and how to project income and expenses is also covered.

Prerequisite: None

This course introduces students to principles, concepts and practice of human resource management. Students will learn about human resources and personnel functions. There is an emphasis on how managers can deal with and utilize human resource functions.

Prerequisite: None

The weekly News Hour will be produced by students. This non-denominational Christian news program will focus on events and information of interest to the Christian community. Students will prepare pre-taped teaching material to be broadcast. Students will also participate in production, scripting, audio engineering, and direct production.

Prerequisite: None

This course introduces students to the use of the personal computer in preparing quality material for printing using windows, word processing software, as well as graphics and desktop programs. Students are introduced to the use of several software programs used in preparing low cost advertising, publications, newsletters, brochures, bulletins and other documents.

Prerequisite: None

The course covers all aspects of computational skills with the goal of giving students sufficient skills to successfully function in a business environment.

Prerequisite: None

This course covers journal entries, general ledger posting, payroll entries, cost and PST entries, bank reconciliations, spreadsheets, income and expenditure accounts, trial balances and the balance sheet. Students are encouraged to test their knowledge by utilizing a computerized accounting software package in their home environment.

Prerequisite: BUSN 415

This course is designed to help students develop basic skills in writing for publication. Students will gain experience in writing how-to-do-it articles, feature articles, biographical materials, narrative or adventure articles and devotional materials.

Prerequisite: None

This course is designed to increase students’ understanding of legal principles which apply to normal business transactions; contracts, labour-management responsibilities, property, insurance, partnerships, corporations, wills and trusts, torts, and business crime are among the topics covered in this course.

Prerequisite: None

Christian Counselling

This introductory course provides a broad overview of the field of addiction. Students explore factors related to why psychoactive substances are used, abused, and misused. The course also examines addictive and compulsive behaviours related to gambling, shopping, internet pornography, and sex.

Prerequisite: None

This course is designed to introduce students to family dynamics when substance abuse or other forms of addiction are present. Students are introduced to theories of marriage and family and substance abuse, as well as practical considerations relating to assessment and interventions.

Prerequisite: ADDC 110

This course introduces students to the theoretical and practical dimensions of working with and counselling young people who are addicted and are experiencing challenges associated with drug use. Students will explore the nature of human vulnerability and how through assessment, counselling, treatment, and behaviour change strategies positive outcomes can be achieved.

Prerequisite: ADDC 110 and PSY 244

This course introduces students to a theological understanding of factors underlying addictive patterns in human behaviours. Students examine contemporary theories and models of addiction as well as assessment and interventions against the theological perspective of addiction and behaviour change.

Prerequisite: COUN 302

This course is a continuation of ADDC 110. It introduces students to the nature of current drugs and how they are being abused and misused. Students will undertake a survey approach in examining current treatment approaches and their effectiveness in helping people recover from these undesired behaviours.

Prerequisite: ADDC 110

This course introduces students to the major classifications of psychoactive drugs and surveys of physiological and behavioural effects of these classes of drugs. Topics include basic principles of pharmacology, classification of drugs, tolerance, dependence, withdrawal, therapeutic and toxic effects of psychoactive drugs.

Prerequisite: None

This course provides students with the understanding of the relapse and recovery process. Students examine major themes in the relapse process as well as relapse warning signs and relapse prevention principles. Topics discussed include relapse warning signs, principles of prevention, importance of spirituality in recovery; situational, psychological, and physiological obstacles to recovery.

Prerequisite: ADDC 401 & COUN 335

This course provides an overview of concepts and skills related to counselling individuals who are addicted. Students are introduced to different theoretical approaches to addiction counselling.

Prerequisite: None

This course introduces students to the multifaceted world of assessment of addictions, and thereafter, the best practices of matching treatment plans to different addictions.

The course provides students with an overview of compulsive and addictive behaviour. Students examine theories of compulsive and addictive disorders, assessment strategies and treatment methods for these behaviours. Throughout the course students are encouraged to integrate a biblical understanding with treatment strategies.

Prerequisite: ADDC 335

This course provides students with an overview of perspectives and models of relapse, prevention, assessment and treatment, as well as counselling strategies. Students learn about and compare the various models in terms of their theoretical frames and applications.

This course examines the effects of addiction on family roles, rules, communication, boundaries, structure, functions, and behaviour patterns. Students in this course are introduced to strategies and approaches through which the counsellor can effectively work toward health and change in the family affected by addiction.

Prerequisite: COUN 535

Students are introduced to interviewing and assessment modalities for the evaluation of substance abuse, dependency and other forms of addictive behaviours.

Prerequisite: ADDC 530

This course introduces students to the theories and approaches in assessing and treating concurrent disorders in addiction. Students will examine the screening, assessment, and treatment process. An examination of the DSM-IV-TR will also be a focus in the course.

Prerequisite: ADDC 530

An in-depth exploration of special issues in addiction is undertaken. Special emphasis is on dual diagnosis, special population, ethics, gambling, infectious diseases, etc.

Prerequisite: None

This course will provide fundamental knowledge about the development of effective interpersonal skills for relationships. Personal, family, situational, and cultural influences of interaction will be covered.

Prerequisite: None

The course covers the nature, dynamics, and processes of communication within the context of the marital relationship. Students in this course will learn the different styles of communication and how they affect marital relationships. The emphasis in the course will be on identifying healthy and unhealthy patterns of communication and strategies for improving unhealthy patterns.

Prerequisite: None

This is an introductory course in the field of pastoral care and counselling. The course explores the unique place and skills of both pastoral care and pastoral counselling. It seeks to provide an overview of the theories, methods and practices of pastoral care and counselling in the Christian congregations as well as with individuals and groups.

Prerequisite: None

This course introduces students to the wide field of counselling with a biblical basis for counselling, integration of psychology and theology, counselling needs, methods and theories.

Prerequisite: None

The purpose of this course is to examine the physical, mental, emotional, social and spiritual dynamics and issues relating to loss and grief. To this end the course explores models of coping for individuals in distress and transition as a result of loss and bereavement.

Prerequisite: COUN 235

A study of the biblical model of counselling and how it relates and differs from some of the more common forms of secular models and theories of helping individuals. The primary goals of this course are to encourage biblical thinking and explore biblical principles for promoting lasting change in people.

Prerequisite: None

This course introduces learners to the theories, techniques and clinical applications of counselling children and adolescents. The study includes interventions with emotionally disturbed, abused, or behaviourally disordered children.

Prerequisite: PSYC 244

This is a study of the theological foundations for counselling. The course explores biblical teachings concerning the nature of human beings, their brokenness, unhealthy coping skills, dysfunctional and unhealthy patterns of living and the usefulness of counselling in helping individuals move toward more self-awareness, productive and healthy relationships and living.

Prerequisite: None

This course presents an introduction to the theory and strategies of conflict resolution, with special emphasis on conflict in interpersonal relationships. The study will help learners to understand the nature of human and interpersonal conflicts, and models and constructive ways to deal with conflict in various situations. Consideration is given to biblical models of conflict resolution.

The course presents an overview of the history, major theoretical and therapeutic models of marriage and family therapy. Some of these include psychodynamic, structural, strategic, communications, experiential and post-modern. Throughout the course, students are encouraged to evaluate their effectiveness and relevance against a biblical understanding of marriage and family.

Prerequisite: None

This course introduces students to a Christian perspective of marriage and family life. The primary emphasis in this course is the exploration of the biblical model for relationships and family life. Topics include the biblical basis for marriage and family life, Christian model for parenting, mate selection, authentic sexuality, and so on.

Prerequisite: None

This course examines the basic theories, assumptions, and therapeutic processes that underline the different therapeutic approaches to counselling and psychotherapy. Students will gain understanding of some of the most popular theories and approaches which form the major forces in counselling psychology.

Prerequisite: COUN 235

This course is designed to help students deepen their understanding of pastoral care. Students in this course will explore the theological and psychological bases for contemporary pastoral care.

Prerequisite: COUN 222 and COUN 235

This course examines key concepts and issues related to the human response to loss and the facilitation of healthy bereavement. The study covers topics such as theoretical perspectives and models of grieving, coping, development, culture, family and other variables associated with the human response to loss and grief.

Prerequisite: COUN 235 and COUN 290

In this lab course students are introduced to practical counselling skills needed to build their competence for practicum experience. Students will work in a pre-designed counselling environment under the supervision of a faculty member in which they are given opportunities to work with real life scenarios. This course is a prerequisite for the counselling practicum.

Prerequisite: COUN 366 and COUN 235

This course introduces students to the theory, interventions, and research on counselling individuals and family experiencing situational, transitional, cultural, and sociostructural crises.

Prerequisite: None

This course is designed to introduce students to the major theories of family pathology. They will compare the structures, rules, and communication styles of healthy and dysfunctional families based on major family theories. Throughout the course students will be encouraged to compare biblical concepts of family life with various theoretical perspectives.

Prerequisite: COUN 356, COUN 310 and COUN 235

This course introduces students to the nature of God, the nature of Satan, the works of angels, the works and nature of demons. This course examines the nature of the spirit world and its place in God’s overall plan. Students also learn about the place of spiritual warfare in counselling a variety of clients.

Prerequisite: THEO 240

This course is designed to introduce students to the nature of violence in family relationships. Students will examine variables relating to the frequency and types of family violence as well as social and psychological correlates of violence in family relationships.

Prerequisite: COUN 205, COUN 430, COUN 444 COUN 235, and COUN 290

This course offers both a biblical and family systems conceptualization of family pathology. Students will gain an understanding of the etiology and maintenance of family pathology. Topics considered in this course include styles of family interaction, family boundaries, roles, family life cycle, etc.

Prerequisite: COUN 430

Life and death form the entire spectrum of Christian counselling.  This class introduces students to the latter end of the spectrum and provides them with a toolset necessary to help those under their care.

The major goal in this course is to lead students to an understanding of the various stages families go through and the influences that bear on each stage of development and how the family can be strengthened through each stage of its development.

Prerequisite: None

This course is designed to introduce students to both formal and informal marriage and family assessment methods. An overview of marriage and family assessment instruments will be a part of this course, in addition to formal assessment strategies.

Prerequisite: COUN 310, COUN 444, and COUN 467

With the approval of the counselling department, students gain practical experience working in an approved clinical setting under an approved supervisor. This is undertaken only when students have completed all necessary specialization courses.

Prerequisite: COUN 399

This course comprises multiple avenues for students to enhance their counselling skills.  Some mock drills and case studies are incorporated into the curriculum to develop the practical skills of future Christian counselors. 

This study introduces students to how the science of psychology relates to Christian theology. The study provides an overview of the major models of integration as well as discussions on the relevance of integration. Students will examine the role of science, faith, and theology as applied to counselling.

Prerequisite: PSYC 220and THEO 606 or THEO 601

An in-depth exploration of major theories and techniques in the fields of marriage and family therapy. Major theoretical approaches are examined to develop a framework within which the student can understand the nature of intimate relationships and the dynamics of marital and family therapy.

Prerequisite: PSYC 430 and COUN 444

This course provides students with knowledge of the role and responsibilities of the case manager in treatment settings. Students learn about after-care plans, report writing, testing, confidentiality, and advocacy. Information about such responsibilities as liaison, intake, follow-up, and record keeping as well as legal requirements are explored.

Prerequisite: None

Counselling principles and techniques as applied to children and adolescents will be presented and analyzed. The course examines the theoretical and empirical literature associated with risks and resiliency during adolescence. It provides a comprehensive guide to counselling children and adolescents, with an emphasis on familial, emotional, and social influences within the stages of childhood and adolescence.

Prerequisite: PSYC 510

This course explores practical and theoretical issues in counselling individuals and families from different cultural backgrounds. Students are introduced to cultural, social, historical, and political forces which bear influence on how individuals and families interact and behave. Topics covered include culturally sensitive counselling, multicultural factors in development and learning, values clarification, working with under-served clients, and culturally diverse family structures, roles, values and rituals.

Prerequisite: None

This course examines ethical and legal practices and discussions about ethical issues in professional practice. It discusses legal requirements and accountability for the profession and the relationship of ethical practices that relate to global and local resource allocations.

Prerequisite: None

This course provides students with an in-depth study of co-dependency behaviours. Students examine theories and approaches for working with individuals who are codependent and addicted.

Prerequisite: PSYC 610

This course introduces students to the nature and reality of spiritual crisis and strategies and approaches in pastoral care and counselling through which these spiritual challenges can be overcome. Students in this course will learn about stages of spiritual growth and development, hindrances to spiritual growth, perceptions of loss of significance and purpose, dysfunctional faith, the stages of backsliding, strongholds and spiritual addictions, etc.

Prerequisite: None

An advanced study of the biblical model of counselling and how it relates and differs from some of the more common forms of secular models and theories of helping individuals. The primary goals of this course are: (1) to encourage theological thinking in students, (2) to explore biblical principles for promoting lasting change in people, and (3) to develop a theological frame for Christian counselling which is grounded in the theology of change, the theological and psychological understanding of human nature.

Prerequisite: COUN 300

This course introduces students to the complex interplay between personal religious beliefs and psychological well-being. 

This course introduces students to the study of pastoral care in the context of chaplaincy. It presents the theological foundations for chaplaincy and the role of the chaplain. Students in this course will learn about the balance between caring and justice, as well as ethical and professional guidelines in chaplaincy, life within the institution, the place of Christian care giver in the community, role of institutions, relationship of the Church to the world, etc.

Prerequisite: None

This advanced course takes students into an in-depth exploration of the issues, theories and practice of pastoral care and counselling. Topics covered in this course include models of pastoral care, pastoral care in times of grief and loss, spirituality in pastoral care, spiritual care for the ill and dying, marriage enrichment counselling, etc.

Prerequisite: COUN 385

This course introduces students to the dangers and harms associated with addictions and family well-being. 

This course provides an advanced examination of clinical theory, systemic interviewing skills, methods and strategies of assessment and intervention, and assessment instruments used in marriage and family therapy. Students will examine the strengths and limitations of these strategies and approaches.

Prerequisite: COUN 535

This course introduces students to the psychological theories and outlooks pertaining to personality formation. 

This course expands the students understanding of interviewing and assessment skills through extended practice, group exercises, case studies, and relevant readings. The focus of this course is on the development of clinical interviewing skills.

Prerequisite: None

This course presents the study of how to establish and maintain a private counselling practice. Topics range from how to create a business name, registering the business, writing a business plan, determining the nature of the counselling practice, selecting a location, the target population, how to advertise, legal issues, office procedures, report management, etc.

Prerequisite: None

This course introduces students to the theory, principles, and strategies for working with small groups in a variety of contexts. Special emphasis in the course is on social climate, group membership, leadership style and functions, stages of group development, group behaviour and other variables as they relate to the dynamics of group process and individual behaviour.

Prerequisite: COUN 235 and COUN 307

This course introduces students to the field of pharmacology. Students study the structure and function of the central nervous system and review the psychological, physiological, and sociological effects of mood-altering drugs and their implications.

Prerequisite: None

This course provides an overview of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorder (DSM) and how it is used in clinical assessment and diagnosis of clients. Students will become familiar with the characteristics of various disorders and how to assess these disorders based on the guidelines of the DSM.

Prerequisite: COUN501

This course introduces students to the theological themes in the study of human beings. Questions as to what constitutes a healthy and dysfunctional personhood will be explored as well as the nature of human personhood itself.

Prerequisite: COUN 519

This course is designed to equip students with both practical and empirical information about how trauma impacts the whole person: mind, body, and spirit. The course will focus on the history, theory, and best-practice treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder. Prerequisite: None

This advanced course provides an overview of theories that use metaphors of system, pattern, interaction, and communication to describe human behavior and relationships. The course focuses on the nature and structure of family life through the lens of family systems theories. Throughout the course students are encouraged to make relevant comparison of theories with the biblical model of the family.

Prerequisite: None

This advanced course provides students with a wider and more in-depth study offamily pathology. Students will examine the interactive processes hypothesized in the etiology and maintenance of various family dysfunctions. Throughout the course, students are encouraged to view family pathology through the eyes of the biblical model of the effect of sin in human relationships.

Prerequisite: COUN 535

In consultation with faculty, students select a research topic, develop and complete an academically accepted thesis in partial fulfilment of the requirements for graduation.

Prerequisite: COUN 400 and Faculty Approval

Students are required to complete an approved supervised internship in order to fulfill the requirement of the master’s degree program. This will provide students with the opportunity to gain practical experience and integrate knowledge and skills in a clinical setting as well as develop and refine necessary skills and competencies needed for clinical practice at a professional level.

Prerequisite: COUN 501, COUN 665 and Approval of Faculty

A study of the philosophical foundations of religion, the issues connected with beliefs and practice, the cause of evil, mind-body, morality, values and knowledge, faith and reasons. The course will explore the implications of these issues for the context of counselling.

Prerequisite: None

This advanced course is designed to introduce graduate students to the underlying philosophical foundations of leadership theory, models, and styles. The course provides opportunities for emerging and existing leaders to explore the concepts of leadership and to develop and improve their own leadership skills.

Prerequisite: None

Christian counselling is a uniquely spiritual subset of broader counselling practices.  This course introduces students to the spiritual aspects of counselling and how they differ from secular-focused practices.

This is an advanced course in which students explore and examine the nature of assessment and treatment planning in light of current knowledge (theological and scientific) of individuals, their life contexts and relations.

This course provides an advanced examination of clinical and intervention theories, systemic interviewing skills, methods and strategies of assessment and intervention used in counselling. Throughout the course students will critically examine secular clinical strategies from the frame of a biblical understanding of the dynamics of change as it relates to human nature.

Prerequisite: COUN 501 & COUN 665

An exploration of the unique role played by the church in mental health. Students will examine theories and models of social support in mental health and discuss the church’s unique function in light of these theories and models as well as our understanding of human needs.

This course is designed to advance the student’s theoretical, empirical and practical understanding of cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT). Students will learn how to assess and treat a variety of conditions using cognitive behavioural strategies.

Prerequisite: COUN 501

Learners in this course examine the dynamics within families and the systems and factors that influence the family, such as church, school, community, politics, career, lifestyle, and societal organizations.

Prerequisite: None

An introduction to the nature and problem of suffering as conceptualized by Christian Theism, with a focus on the question “why do people suffer”? Learners in this course examine current theories on suffering in light of the biblical doctrine of suffering and discuss the relevance and usefulness of the counselling process in helping people with various conditions of pain.

The purpose of this course is to teach students how to develop a positive rapport with clients of various ages and backgrounds. Students will develop a wide range of clinical practice skills that are based on the unique needs of clients. These skills will cover three main dimensions: Listening skills, engaging skills, and responding skills.

Prerequisite: None

This course provides students with a solid theological understanding of the nature and necessary requirements for lifestyle change and development in a person’s life and growth.

Prerequisite: None

In consultation with faculty, students select a research topic, develop and complete an academically acceptable thesis, worthy of approval of the thesis committee.

Prerequisite: COUN 400, COUN 805, and Faculty Approval.

Doctoral counselling students are required to complete an approved supervised internship in order to fulfill the requirement of the Doctor of Christian Counselling Degree. This will provide students with the opportunity to gain practical experience and integrate knowledge and skills in a clinical setting as well as develop and refine necessary skills and competencies needed for clinical practice at a professional level.

Prerequisite: Approval of Faculty

This course is an introduction to psychology as a special science. It introduces students to the broad field of psychology by exploring the history, theory, research and applications of psychology.

Prerequisite: None

This course is an overview of normal development from birth through to old age, with an emphasis on the psychological characteristics of each stage of development. Consideration is also given to physical, emotional, social, moral, spiritual and intellectual development.

Prerequisite: PSYC 220

This course introduces the study of individual behaviour within social contexts. The aim is to study the range of theories and research concerned with human thinking and behaviour in a social world.

Prerequisite: PSYC 220

This course is an introduction to the theoretical and practical issues, perspectives and techniques of psychological testing and test construction. A secondary emphasis in this course is on the application of various psychological tests.

Prerequisite: PSYC 220

This course introduces students to the study of human sexuality by providing the biological, psychological, sociocultural as well as the theological aspects of human sexuality and related research. Topics covered in this course include reproductive biology, theories of sexuality, psychosexual development, sexual orientation, contraceptive techniques, sexually transmitted diseases, sexual disorders, and authentic sexuality.

Prerequisite: PSYC 220

This course introduces students to the various psychological disorders as well as theoretical, clinical, and experimental perspectives of the study of psychological disorders. Emphasis in this course will be placed on terminology, classifications, etiology, assessment, and treatment of the major forms of psychological disorders.

Prerequisite: PSYC 220

This course introduces students to the major issues, perspectives and empirical approaches to the psychology of religion. The course highlights the role of religion as a powerful and influential meaning making system and examines ways in which individuals’ beliefs, values, motivations, emotions, and behaviours are influenced.

Prerequisite: None

This course focuses on the psychological influences that affect our health and vulnerability to illness. Students are introduced to the complex interactions between mind and body. Special emphasis will be given to the role of stress and stressors on psychological, spiritual, emotional, and physical health and well-being.

Prerequisite: PSYC 220

An analysis of the psychology of the Christian experience from a biblical perspective. The primary goal of the course is to contribute to the student’s understanding of the biblical doctrine of change in the context of redemption and how aspects of such change experiences can be understood psychologically.

Prerequisite: PSYC 616 and PSYC 220

This course introduces students to a comprehensive survey of contemporary and classical perspectives of personality and personality development. Students will examine theories regarding personality structure and dynamics, personality dysfunction and problems involved in personality adjustment and assessment.

Prerequisite: PSYC 220 and PSYC 510

This course is designed to introduce students to the field of social work. It offers an overview of the settings in which social workers practice, the populations they encounter, the social problems they address, and the interventions they utilize. The course examines the knowledge, values, ethics, and skills necessary for the effective practice of social work.

Prerequisite: SOCW 205

This course introduces students to the exploration of society, which include statistics data and a reflection of contemporary research and theoretical ideas that have emerged within sociology. The course focuses on the primary goal of sociology: the development of a connected understanding of society.

Prerequisite: None

The course provides a general overview of the crisis intervention from a practitioner’s (counselor or social worker, church leader, community worker) standpoint. Students will explore various models used in adjudicating the severity of a client’s presenting crisis situation in gaining some sense of direction in helping the client cope with the dilemma.

Prerequisite: None

This course introduces students to the profession of social work, its value base, field of practice, and societal role. The course addresses topics major relating to social problems, philosophies of social welfare provision, program and policy initiative, and the response of social work as a profession.

Prerequisite: SOCW 155, and SOCW 205

This course introduces the general skills and challenges of working with diverse populations. The course presents the social work role in attaining social, economic, physical, and emotional wellbeing for all people. It introduces language and ideas relevant to civil rights and social justice.

Prerequisite: SOCW 205

The course explores the interactional model of practice in the context of social work with groups. The course explores the principles and phases of group formation and looks at various elements of contracting introduced by different types of groups.

Prerequisite: SOCW 205 and PSYC 275

This course exposes students to a variety of contrasting theoretical models underlying both individual and group practice in social work. Through case studies, demonstrations, small-group discussions and experiential activities. Students are assisted to critically evaluate the practical applications of contemporary social work perspectives.

Prerequisite: SOCW205

This course introduces basic sociological research in the area of marriage and family, helping students become familiar with topics of concern to area specialists. It also examines the dynamics of family relationships so that material can be useful to students in their own lives. In general, the emphasis is on family strengths and differences as well as family problems.

Prerequisite: SOCW 205

This course is designed as an introductory course on social work practice. It offers an understanding of cases and methods which includes what social workers do as part of their helping process. Students have the opportunity to review “evidenced-based” practice models and explore the existing common elements in working with individuals, families and significant others in the systems.

Prerequisite: SOCW 155

This course is designed to introduce students to a logical progression, beginning with most basic foundation for good practice. It equips students with vocabulary and methods used by more advanced professionals in the human service field.

Prerequisite: None

This course introduces students to the sociological study of religion and how these perspectives relate to theology or the Christian doctrines. The study provides an overview of theories that explain the integration of religion and meaning of life; religion and scientific explanations. The course challenges students to think critically on the components of world religions and the future of the Christian doctrines. Some of the topics discussed in this course include functionalist perspectives, conflict perspectives, symbolic interactionist perspectives on religion, types of religious organization, developmental approaches to religion, religion and health, religion and coping with stress, religion and drugs.

Prerequisite: SOCW 205

The course introduces students to social welfare policy as the basis for social service provision. It offers an understanding of how policy dictates the implementation of social welfare programs and structures the context in which practitioners can do their work. The course describes social welfare and social work history; social welfare policy development and the structural components of policy. 

Prerequisite: SOCW 155

This course is about the integration of Christian faith and social work practice. The course does not only offer a Christian perspective on the social work profession as a whole, but it explores Christian faith on specific topics within the profession. Students explore the intercept between faith and social work practice.

Prerequisite: None

With the approval of the counselling department, students gain practical experience (120 hours) working in an approved social work or clinical setting under an approved supervisor. This is undertaken only when students have completed all necessary specialization courses.

Prerequisite: COUN 399

Religious Education

A study of Vacation Bible School as an effective tool to reach children for Christ. This course includes a consideration of the purpose, planning, and organizing of all personal and material needed for implementing an effective Vacation Bible School.

Prerequisite: None

A survey and examination of the religious educational principles and practices throughout various periods of history with a consideration of current theories of education. Students are required to formulate a personal philosophy of Christian education consistent with biblical teaching.

Prerequisite: None

This course is a continuation of EDUC 201 with consideration given to key characters and the influence of Christian education on the church and society in which it was established.

Prerequisite: EDUC 201

This final part of the philosophy of Christian education continues to build on both EDUC 201 and EDUC 205 and deepens students’ understanding of and appreciation for the practice of Christian education.

Prerequisite: EDUC 201 and EDUC 205

A consideration of the administrative principles and practices involved in developing and maintaining a functional administrative structure for the educational ministries of a local church.

Prerequisite: None

This course is designed to introduce students to principles and practices in establishing a Christian Day School or Church Day Care ministry. Considerations are given to legal and educational requirements involved in such an endeavour. Practical steps are explored in beginning, administrating, staffing and recruiting students for the new school.

Prerequisite: None

A study of various approaches to effective teaching with an emphasis on specific strategies which have proven to be more effective in facilitating learning.

Prerequisite: None

This course introduces students to the multifaceted world of Christian education, including pedagogical theory and spiritual formation. 

A study of the basic principles of teaching and learning with a focus on the teaching-learning process in Christian contexts. Students will learn how to teach the scripture in a variety of settings including small group and Sunday School, and to learners at different developmental stage.

Prerequisite: EDUC 303

This course considers the characteristics, challenges and needs in teaching children from birth through adolescence. Leadership, organization, curriculum, teaching strategies, program planning and evangelism are considered in reaching, teaching and holding children in the church. A discussion of practical problems and evaluation of current trends and curriculum in children’s ministries will be a vital part of this study.

Prerequisite: EDUC 401 is recommended but not necessary

This course considers the characteristics, challenges and needs in teaching children from adolescence through early adulthood. Leadership, organization, curriculum, teaching strategies, program planning and evangelism are considered in reaching, teaching and holding young people in the church. A discussion of practical problems and evaluation of current trends and curriculum in youth ministries will be a vital part of this study.

Prerequisite: EDUC 401 is recommended but not necessary

This course considers the characteristics, challenges and needs in teaching adults in various stages of adulthood. Leadership, organization, curriculum, teaching strategies, program planning and evangelism are considered in reaching, teaching and holding adults in the church. A discussion of practical problems and evaluation of current rends and curriculum in adult ministries will be a vital part of this study including ministries to both single and senior adults.

Prerequisite: EDUC 401 is recommended but not necessary.

This course considers the characteristics, challenges and needs in teaching families in various stages of development from marriage to the birth of their first child through the empty nest syndrome. Leadership, organization, curriculum, teaching strategies, program planning and evangelism are considered in reaching, teaching and holding families in the church. A discussion of practical problems and evaluation of current trends and curriculum in family ministries will be a vital part of this study with a focus of producing a balanced ministry to families.

Prerequisite: EDUC 401 is recommended but not necessary.

A study of the basic principles of teaching and learning with a focus on the teaching-learning process in Christian contexts. Students will learn how to teach the scripture in a variety of settings including small group and Sunday School, and to learners at different developmental stage.

Prerequisite: EDUC 303

School of Music

Lessons are offered in piano, guitar, bass guitar, drums and voice. Other instruments can be arranged through adjunct professors. Students must have seven semesters of weekly half-hour private lessons in order to graduate with the B.S.M. degree. Each semester consists of twelve private lessons which will be assessed weekly by the professor. Each student must contact their instrumental or vocal professor no later than the first week of classes to schedule a lesson time as private lessons must begin during the second week of classes. This will allow a sufficient number of weeks to complete the mandatory 12 lessons in order to achieve credit toward the degree. All applied music instruction MUST be with Canada Christian College music professors or adjunct professors who may be appointed for other instruments.

This course provides the fundamentals of keyboard, ear training, and music theory at the introductory level.

Prerequisite: None.

This course is a continuation of Fundamentals of Music 1.

Prerequisite: Fundamentals of Music 1 [or exemption by consent of the Dean of Sacred Music]

This course will introduce students to a Biblical understanding of worship and the role of worship ministry in the New Testament Church.

This course will continue the studies of MUSC121.

Prerequisite: Worship Theology & Practice 1

This course is designed for students with little or no experience playing guitar. Students will learn the basics of playing guitar including the parts of the guitar, tuning, playing position and musical symbols. Chords will be introduced along with basic strumming patterns that can be used for accompaniment.

This course will continue the studies of Introduction to Guitar 1.

Prerequisite: Introduction to Guitar 1 [or by consent of the instructor]

This course is designed to teach the basics of recording, including microphones and microphone techniques, mixers and mixing techniques, effects, mastering, modern studio techniques, computer recording, MIDI, audio editing, and more. Students will participate in a Recording Project.

This will expand on Audio Recording 1 with a greater emphasis on hands-on experimentation and studio techniques.

Prerequisite: Audio Recording 1 [or by consent of the instructor]

Students will have the opportunity to participate in the College Gospel Choir learning a variety of songs in a contemporary gospel style. This course is mandatory for all Sacred Music students. Non-music majors are welcome – an audition may be required.

This course will offer an understanding of basic and intermediate music notation. It will help the student develop skills in music reading.

Prerequisite: Fundamentals of Music 1 & 2. [or exemption by consent of the Dean of Sacred Music]

This course is a continuation of Theory 1 and will cover the principles of music notation and time at a more advanced level.

Prerequisite: Music Theory 1 [or exemption by consent of the Dean of Sacred Music]

This course will introduce the student to basic ear-training and sight-singing skills. Chords will be introduced in audible and written form. As a result of this course, the student will develop key recognition skills, will be able to sight-sing simple melodies and be able to clap and sing rhythms in simple and compound time.

Prerequisite: Fundaments of Music [or exemption by consent of the Dean of Sacred Music]

This course is a continuation of Ear Training 1 with a further emphasis on advanced interval recognition and sight singing of entire short songs. Each class will involve rhythmic drills to further develop ear training and sight singing skills.

Prerequisite: Ear Training 1, Fundamentals of Music 1

This course will study the foundational principles of songwriting including song forms, chord progressions, basic lyric and melody development, rhyming structure, and song analysis. The ability to accompany oneself (piano, guitar, etc.) is an asset but is not mandatory.

This course will continue the studies of Songwriting 1 and will look at writing songs for corporate worship.

Prerequisite: Songwriting 1 [or by consent of the instructor]

Students will study the technical aspects of equipment used to enhance the worship experience. Topics will include PA systems, microphones and microphone techniques, audio mixers and mixing, lighting, video projection and presentation software.

Prerequisite: None

In this course, students will learn how to produce their own song(s) by creating a CD Recording. They will study the process of “Song Production in the Recording Studio” from inception to finished product including elements such as song-selection, arrangements, orchestration, preproduction, production, timelines, tracking, overdubbing, editing, mixing, mastering, artwork & duplication.

Prerequisite: Songwriting 1, Corequisite: Song Recording

See “Song Production.” In order for students to create a CD Recording, they will need a significant amount of Studio hours to complete their projects. By enrolling in both courses, it will facilitate the necessary Studio time for students.

Prerequisite: Songwriting 1, Corequisite: Song Production

The Junior Music Ensemble course is designed to give students experience in creating music in an ensemble setting, primarily in the context of worship leadership. Students will regularly take part in leading the College Student Chapel on Tuesdays at 8:00 PM. This course will emphasize three key areas of working together as a worship ensemble: music, worship and teamwork.

The Senior Music Ensemble course is selective and available to students by try-outs only.  Like its junior course counterpart, it is designed to give students experience in creating music in an ensemble setting, primarily in the context of worship leadership. Students will regularly take part in leading the College Student Chapel on Tuesdays at 8:00 PM. This course will emphasize three key areas of working together as a worship ensemble: music, worship and teamwork.

Students will discover the core elements of managing a worship ministry music team; whether in the local church setting, or as an independent Christian artist or group. Topics such as recruiting, team administration, worship service and song list planning, and the relationship between worship leader and senior pastor will be discussed. Current social media sites, cloud-based and software-based applications and tools available to worship leaders will also be highlighted. Prerequisite: None

This course is an introduction to common practice harmony, including all diatonic triads with their inversions, supertonic and dominant 7th chords, basic harmonic and structural analysis.

Prerequisite: Music Theory 2 [or exemption by consent of the Dean of Sacred Music]

This course is a continuation of Music Theory 3A.

Prerequisite: Music Theory 3A [or exemption by consent of the Dean of Sacred Music]

Students will study about developing a God-centered focus in personal and corporate worship, valuing different traditions of church worship and understanding how to build and administrate a worship and musical arts department.

This course will provide an overview of the growth of Christian worship and its impact on contemporary worship in the church, considering the history of different denominations and their worship. It will be survey of the roots and significant developments of Christian worship through its formative period to the present.

This course is based on an introduction to music history through an overview of four historical periods: Baroque, Classical, Romantic and the Modern Era. Church music and the history of Gospel music will be highlighted.

Prerequisite: Music Theory 2 [or exemption by consent of the Dean of Sacred Music]

This course will emphasize the principles of Worship Leading as a guitarist (primarily acoustic guitar). Students will learn the role of the guitar as a worship leading instrument and study a wide variety of worship music (traditional and contemporary) and learn how to integrate different styles into their repertoire.

Prerequisite: Introduction to Guitar 1 [or by consent of the instructor]

Cubase is a common recording program. All students are required to have a laptop loaded with Cubase (the Lite version is acceptable, but the full version preferable), an interface, and a microphone. This course will cover the various features of the program, including recording, mixing, using plug-ins, MIDI, pitch and tempo correction and more.

MIDI stands for Musical Instrument Digital Interface. In MIDI, students will be trained to arrange entire. songs with one keyboard and a software program, learning how to program drums and other instruments, quantizing, correcting errors, editing and more. Cubase or similar MIDI software is required.

Students will learn to utilize all functions of Finale, and learn to make commonly used lead sheets, vocal arrangements, and scores for a variety of instruments as well as learn how to share sheet music digitally, important copyright laws and more.

Prerequisite: Music Theory 2; Music Theory 3A&B recommended.

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of music production.

This course introduces students to the advanced aspects of music production. 

Prerequisite: Music Production 1

This course introduces students to foundational aspects of music technology.

This course introduces students to the advanced aspects of music technology. 

Prerequisite: Music Technology I.

How do music artists grow professionally?  This course introduces aspiring music artists to the best practices of artistic development.

This course introduces aspiring music artists to further advanced aspects of artistic development.

Prerequisite: Artist Development 1

This course continues to help students develop their ability to play and write music by to ear.

This course introduces students to the most advanced techniques involved in playing or writing music by ear.

This course will involve ear training through the use of various scales, modes and chord structures as it would apply to popular idioms.

Prerequisite: Music Theory 3B (or exemption by consent of the Dean of Performing Arts)

Students may elect to undergo an internship with an approved church or non-profit organization for degree credit.

This course provides further study of common practice harmony with the addition of secondary dominant chords, modulation to closely related keys, and intermediate level structural analysis.

Prerequisite: Music Theory 3B [or exemption by consent of the Dean of Sacred Music]

This course is a continuation of Music Theory 4A.

Prerequisite: Music Theory 4A [or exemption by consent of the Dean of Sacred Music]

Students will be trained in creating arrangements for songs, with an emphasis on creating charts and parts for various instruments.

Prerequisite: Music Theory 3B [or by consent of the instructor]

This course will take an in-depth look at Chord Progressions and Lyric Writing and Song Development in Corporate Worship.

Prerequisite: Songwriting 2 [or by consent of the instructor]

The Music History 2 course is based on four historical style periods: Middle Ages, Renaissance, Baroque and Classical, with an emphasis on the development of musical genres and forms.

Prerequisite: Music Theory 3B and Music History Survey [or exemption by consent of the Dean of Sacred Music]

This course is a continuation of Music History 2A.

Prerequisite: Music History 2A [or exemption by consent of the Dean of Sacred Music]

This course code is used to designate Master-level students preparing their thesis.

Graduate Internship. Students will participate in a Supervised Internship in Church Music Ministry/Worship Leadership for one Semester.

In this course, the materials studied in Theory 4A & 4B will be applied to the contrapuntal writing in the style of the Baroque period.

Prerequisite: Music Theory 4B [or exemption by consent of the Dean of Sacred Music]

This course provides further study of common practice harmony with the addition of advanced modulation, mixed mode writing, and creation of two-voice contrapuntal pieces.

Prerequisite: Music Theory 5 [or exemption by consent of the Dean of Sacred Music]

The Music History 3 course is based on the musical styles of the 19th and 20th centuries, including Canadian music.

Prerequisite: Music Theory 4B and Music History 2B [or exemption by consent of the Dean of Sacred Music]

This course is a continuation of Music History 3A.

Prerequisite: Music History 3A [or exemption by consent of the Dean of Sacred Music] audible and written form. As a result of this course, the student will develop key recognition skills, will be able to sight-sing simple melodies and be able to clap and sing rhythms in simple and compound time.

This course provides in depth analysis of Fugue, Sonata, Lied, advanced harmony and short 20th Century pieces.

Prerequisite: Music Theory 6 [or exemption by consent of the Dean of Sacred Music]

This course is a continuation of Music Theory 7A. Prerequisite: Music Theory 7A [or exemption by consent of the Dean of Sacred Music]

Prerequisite: Fundaments of Music [or exemption by consent of the Dean of Sacred Music]

Post-graduate Internship. Students will participate in a Supervised Internship in Church Music Ministry/Worship Leadership for one Semester.

This course code is used to designate doctoral-students completing their dissertation.

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